The MED receives bad marks in Consumer Reports infection story - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

The MED receives bad marks in Consumer Reports infection story

The story will appear in the March issue of Consumer Reports The story will appear in the March issue of Consumer Reports

MEMPHIS, TN (WMC-TV) - A disturbing new report about the Regional Medical Center at Memphis has nothing to do with the hospital's recent money woes, and instead focuses on infection rates.

The report, set to be released in the March issue of Consumer Reports focuses on CLABSI, otherwise known as Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections.


As with any infection, hospitals don't want CLABSI within their walls, but according to Consumer Reports, The MED has more than any other hospital in the state of Tennessee.

For their report, Consumer Reports compiled publicly filed data from across the country.  According to their study, The Med has 238 percent more infections than an average hospital.

Late this afternoon, Angie Herron, Director of Communications at The MED, said the numbers used in the Consumer Reports story are from 2008, and administrators are aware of the CLABSI situation.

Herron said the facility implemented infection control measures in January 2009, and has already noticed a 31.8 percent decline in infections.

"The Med is committed to the elimination of such infections," Herron said in a written statement. "The MED is continuing the successful catheter-associated infection control measures implemented in 2009, and expects infection rates will continue to fall as a result."

You can read the entire statement from The Med below:

Statement re: CLABSI Rate Improvements at The MED

MEMPHIS, Tenn. -  The Regional Medical Center at Memphis' (The MED) Infection Prevention Committee recognized that the ICU central line associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) rate was higher than the NHSN (National Hospital Safety Network) rate in 2008.  As a result, The MED's administrative leadership and Infection Control immediately organized Multidisciplinary Teams to design and execute a program of improvement.  Team members included physicians, staff nurses, infection control preventionists, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and environmental services staff.  

New quality processes that included vascular catheter placement and maintenance were developed and implemented. Since implementing these infection control measures in January 2009, The MED has seen a 31.4 percent decline in the rate of catheter-related infections in 2009 compared to 2008. This decline was tracked in infection data gathered in 2009.  Notable improvements were seen during the last quarter of 2009, when only two central line infections occurred.  

The MED is committed to the elimination of such infections.  The MED is continuing the successful catheter-associated infection control measures implemented in 2009, and expects infection rates will continue to fall as a result.

The Tennessee Department of Health collects and reports data related to the frequency of CLABSI in hospital intensive care units.  The State report represents a starting point and baseline that hospitals can use to track their progress in improving quality care in the ICU. This year is the first time the data has been publicly reported. The State report shows the number of infections per 1,000 "central line" patient days and the data is benchmarked with national statistics.

 


 

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