Bag of severed heads found near Mexico school - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Bag of severed heads found near Mexico school

(CNN) - There's growing fear, frustration and anger over the Mexican drug war and its mounting victims. Many Mexicans say they're fed up with the nearly daily violence.

Five severed heads were dumped near an Acapulco, Mexico elementary school recently in the middle of the morning.

Teachers at that school refuse to work because they're terrified, and thousands have taken to the streets to say enough is enough.

"I think what has caught people's attention in Mexico is how the violence now has reached ordinary people, working people," said Elisabeth Malkin with the New York Times.

At least 140 Acapulco schools closed after criminals left messages saying that teachers who refuse to pay kickbacks will be attacked.

"When I was in Acapulco last week people were saying it's everybody. It's taxi drivers, it's doctors, it's people who sell in the markets there who live hand-to-mouth," Malkin said. "They're all receiving threats."

This year alone, drug violence in Mexico has claimed the lives of more than 9,500 people.

According to Reforma, a Mexico City newspaper that tracks violent deaths, there have been almost 500 beheadings.

"It's important to recognize that the actions of the cartels have changed in Mexico," said Rep. Connie Mack, R-FL. "At one point, a while ago, it was just the shipment of drugs for profit. Now they've changed their tactics into insurgency."

Another concern is that Mexicans are so fed up with violence that they're willing to take justice into their own hands.

A vigilante group that claims its only goal is to kill drug traffickers posted a video on the internet last weekend stating its intentions.

The legitimacy of the video hasn't been verified.  

Time is running out for President Felipe Calderon to reduce drug violence. His six-year term in office expires in 14 months.

But a new survey reveals two-thirds of Mexicans believe that Mexico's next president should continue fighting the war on drugs.

Twenty-seven percent said the next president should try to negotiate with the criminal organizations. The same survey shows that security is the main concern for eight out of every 10 Mexicans.  

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