Holly Springs leaders want to raise sales tax - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Holly Springs leaders want to raise sales tax

Leaders in Holly Springs, Mississippi want to give the city a facelift, but the improvement plan would increase the sales tax. Leaders in Holly Springs, Mississippi want to give the city a facelift, but the improvement plan would increase the sales tax.

(WMC-TV) - Leaders in Holly Springs, Mississippi want to give the city a facelift, but the improvement plan would increase the sales tax.

A one percent sales tax increase is now in the hands of the Mississippi state legislature, after the Holly Springs board of alderman passed the plan at their most recent meeting.

If project goes through, there would be several improvements around the community, but we went to the town to see how they felt about footing the bill.

"This will directly impact residents of the city of Holly Springs," said Mayor Andre DeBerry.

Bumpy sidewalks and streets can be found all across the city, but they could be gone with the help of money from the capital improvement plan.

If you ask people who live there, they know all too well about the headaches the cracks can cause.

"I've driven over some of them, so if it's going to help improve them it would be worth it," said James Herod.

If passed, funds would do much more than smooth the pavement.

"Emergency preparedness, a fire station, sirens, and other things that will improve the quality of life for the people of Holly Springs," DeBerry said.

He wants to add a second fire station for the growing city, buy new police cars to replace their current aging fleet, and install a tornado warning siren.

Do the city shoppers mind picking up the tab?

"Times are too tough right now. People are out of work they can't find work, unemployment's at an all time high. I think that's too big a burden for tax payer right now," said retired resident DP Lyons.

Several tornadoes have threatened the area in the past and Herod was particularly interested in the benefits of the tornado siren.

"If it's going to save lives, you have to weigh the benefits, is a penny worth a life?," Herod asked.

Others like Casey Shaw still say it's a tough time to have to spend more money.

"Taxpayers have paid enough, the middle class pretty much pays everything," Shaw continued. It's just too hard of a time right now to be asking people for more money."

At the end of the day, Shirley McKinney said a penny wouldn't be a big deal to her if it meant improving the city.

"It's just a penny, there ain't no trouble in just a penny or two," McKinney said.

Just a penny would bring in around an estimated $180,000 each year. DeBerry hoped $8 million could be raised by the end of the improvement plan.

"Were hopeful that new businesses will come in and people will spend more as the economy involves and improves."

DeBerry expects the legislature to hear back from the legislature by the beginning of April.

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