Synthetic marijuana lands man behind bars - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Spice ruined my life

Mid-South lawmakers banned the sale of K-2 or Spice almost two years ago. But there are still several states that don't regulate it and one man says the ban came too late. Mid-South lawmakers banned the sale of K-2 or Spice almost two years ago. But there are still several states that don't regulate it and one man says the ban came too late.

(WMC-TV) - Mid-South lawmakers banned the sale of K-2 or Spice almost two years ago. But there are still several states that don't regulate it and one man says the ban came too late.

Anthony Norton was locked up six months ago for exposing himself to children after smoking spice.

He is still behind bars and says the drug derailed everything he hoped for his life.

"Since I heard it was legal, I thought it was okay," he said. "Marijuana is illegal and this is legal. I thought no biggie. It can't harm you. I won't do anything stupid."

But what Anthony Norton is still behind bars for what he did after smoking spice in September.

Investigators say he tried to expose himself to women and a seven-year-old child at a gas station.

"It put me in a whole different world," he said. "It really did. I lost all train of thought, all motor skills. I couldn't control myself."

Norton said Spice, an herb marketed as incense, made him hallucinate and black out.

He takes responsibility for what he did, but said he doesn't remember it.

"I'm totally sorry. I can't think of what I did. I don't know what I did. But I've heard what I did and I would take it back if I could."

But he can't take any of it back.

Charges like soliciting sodomy and cruelty to children aren't taken lightly and Sheriff Jimmy McDuffie is determined to stop the sale of Spice for good.

"I look at Spice as our modern day LSD," said McDuffie. "We don't know what the affects are on one person to the next. You get your young people hooked on it and they can't turn it loose."

Norton's bail is only $1,600, but he says his parents won't bond him out because they're teaching him a lesson.

"I've spent the last six or seven months of my life in jail for smoking Spice and it sucks," he said. "Don't do it."

The problem for lawmakers is that for every substance that gets banned, another is created. Spice manufacturers simply change the ingredients and it's back on the market.

And now some users are simply creating their own chemically altered herbs at home.

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