Hernando neighborhood facing dilemma with bumpy streets - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Hernando neighborhood facing dilemma with bumpy streets

A community in Hernando wants their streets repaired but the city can't pay for it because they say it's a private neighborhood. A community in Hernando wants their streets repaired but the city can't pay for it because they say it's a private neighborhood.

(WMC-TV) - A community in Hernando wants their streets repaired but the city can't pay for it because they say it's a private neighborhood.

Drivers are used to the dips and bumps on the neighborhood streets

"You can see big cracks in the pavement, big potholes and sinkholes," one resident said.

The Cross Creek Neighborhood streets look like a jigsaw puzzle you can see patchwork repairs were made to the potholes piece by piece.

"Kids playing in the street riding their bicycles it's a safety concern," said neighbor Bobby Dunavant.

Hernando Mayor Chip Johnson said his hands are tied because of the law.

"Because it's a gated community it means the streets are private," Johnson continued. "They're not open to the public and state law is very clear that the general public, through tax dollars, can't pay to repair those streets."

Hernando would have to accept the streets as public, but even if that happened Johnson says the streets aren't up to city standards.

"In the condition that they're in now our attorney tells us we couldn't accept them or we would be violating the law," Johnson said.

According to Johnson, the city's street codes were different 15 years ago when the neighborhood was under construction.

Dunavant wants the city and neighborhood to work together because if the problems are not fixed, he worries property value will drop.

"If somebody drives through here expecting to move to Hernando, they may get a bad impression of what Hernando is really like," Dunavant said.

The neighborhood association says they're going to take samples from the roads to see what's needed to bring the streets up to code.

After gathering some facts, the association expects to hold a meeting with neighbors to see if they would be willing to go from private to public.

Johnson said he's open to hearing suggestions.

"We want to do anything we can to help and stay on top of the issue. Just because those streets don't belong to the city doesn't mean the citizens aren't a part of the city," Johnson said.

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