Investigators search Germantown ponds for missing teacher - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Investigators search Germantown ponds for missing teacher

(WMC-TV) – On a calm Sunday afternoon, one Germantown pond was getting a lot of attention.

Investigators set up outside a pond on New Riverdale Road, searching Heather Palumbo-Jones, whom police say has not made contact with her family, friends or co-workers since last Monday.

Investigators say they put a robot in the pond and that it went down and scaled the bottom. If they came upon anything, they dove in. But, the challenge: the water is extremely dirty.

And the dirty water was 55 degrees.

Still two trained divers did a thorough search -- several hours, two ponds -- and found nothing, leaving more questions than answers.

Wednesday investigators searched her Germantown home for clues. They also searched the home of her estranged husband, Chris Jones, and found nothing. 

Friday Jones denied he had anything to do with her disappearance.

He spoke without emotion after a hearing for divorce proceedings for the couple.

"I loved that woman more than anything. There's no way I've put my hands on her or ever put my hands on her."

Still Sunday's search -- with no sign of Palumbo-Jones -- leaves many people on edge, worried about where she might be.

"It was sort of the ending of a nice day, and you come back and you see this...it's a little bit of a downer. You try not to let it get to you. The area is so nice, the people are so nice, so you just try to push through it," Michelle McCormick said. "We just feel awful for the family and we hope that she is found."

Copyright 2013 WMC-TV. All rights reserved.

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