Second victim in East Cleveland triple murder identified - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

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Second victim in East Cleveland triple murder identified

Shetisha Sheeley (Source: Family) Shetisha Sheeley (Source: Family)
Family of Shetisha Sheeley Family of Shetisha Sheeley
Suspect Michael Madison Suspect Michael Madison
EAST CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -

The second victim in the East Cleveland murders has been positively identified as Shetisha Sheeley, 28. 

Sheeley's body was found in a field outside of an abandoned house in the area of Hayden and Shaw Avenues on Saturday.

19 Action News learned her identity on Monday night, but decided not to reveal it at that time out of respect for her family.

On Monday, officials identified the first victim as 38-year-old Angela Deskins. Her body was found inside an abandoned house in the vicinity of Hayden and Shaw on Saturday.

According to the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner, the third victim has not been identified yet.

Suspect Michael Madison, 35, has been charged with kidnapping and aggravated murder and is being held on a $6M bond.

Just before 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Madison was transferred from the East Cleveland Jail to the Cuyahoga County Justice Center.

Copyright 2013 WOIO. All rights reserved.

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