Commissioner: Problem with school food ordering comes at taxpaye - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Commissioner: Problem with school food ordering comes at taxpayers' expense

Commissioner Chris Thomas said he went to several schools after hearing several complaints. Commissioner Chris Thomas said he went to several schools after hearing several complaints.
In one case, he said school workers were directed to throw out food. In one case, he said school workers were directed to throw out food.

(WMC-TV) - A county commissioner says the schools have a serious food ordering problem, and taxpayers are paying for it.

Commissioner Chris Thomas said he went to several schools after hearing several complaints. In one case, he said school workers were directed to throw out food.

"They need to get their act together," said Thomas. "One school was delivered 33 salads, and they only needed 15 ... And told them to take them back. The truck driver said, 'Just throw them away Friday, I can't take them back.' "

Thomas visited several Bartlett schools Wednesday to see for himself. He went to four schools in about three hours.

He said he talked directly to cafeteria staff at Appling Middle, Bartlett Elementary, Bartlett High and Oak Elementary schools.

They, all four, said the same thing. They've ordered food they haven't received. They've received food they didn't order," he said.

Thomas worries the schools are cutting things too close.

"Bartlett High School, as of 12 o'clock today didn't have their food for tomorrow," he said.

As of this report, the kitchen staff received the order for the next day. Thomas says he called Superintendent Dorsey Hopson.

"The superintendent, to his credit, says he's being told everything [is] fine," said Hopson.

The school system tells Action News 5, "Part of a high school's delivery went to an elementary school. Nutrition services got it resolved." They say this was, "Strictly a delivery mix-up that was quickly sorted out." Also that, "There has been no disruption to food service."

"They said they could handle this merger. They've known for months they're going to have to feed all these children, and they're not taking care of business," said Thomas.

He says each cafeteria should control its own food orders, like before the school merger. He plans to visit more schools Wednesday.

Copyright 2013 WMC-TV. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly