Memphis Trivia Tuesday: 'Loco Weed' discovered in community garden

Photos of Memphis during WWII are limited, but this is a flier that circulated the U.S. and the Bluff City during the war, when victory gardens were commonly in use. (Photo Source: Memphians during the War)
Photos of Memphis during WWII are limited, but this is a flier that circulated the U.S. and the Bluff City during the war, when victory gardens were commonly in use. (Photo Source: Memphians during the War)

(WMC) – Police discovered marijuana plants growing in a community "victory" garden in Memphis on West McLemore Avenue this week in 1945.

During World War II, so-called victory gardens sprouted in the Mid-South as the government rationed food in order for canned goods to be saved for the troops.

However, this particular victory garden in Memphis seemed to have a different purpose, according to G. Wayne Dowdy's book, "On This Day in Memphis History."

When the 1,225-square-foot crop, referred to as, "loco weed" was discovered, it had risen 10 feet above the ground and was ready to be cut and dried. Police forces also found a shed that was used for drying and storing the illegal crop.

The two people responsible for this "victory garden" were arrested in suspicion of violating the Narcotics Act, and it remains questionable whether they were involved with a gang distributing marijuana cigarettes across the Memphis area.

WMC Action News 5 brings you a week of history every week with Memphis Trivia Tuesday. Join the conversation with #MemphisTriviaTuesday on Twitter or Facebook. Learn more about Memphis history here: http://bit.ly/1h5D51M.

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