Volunteers knit tiny beanie caps for NICU patients

Volunteers knit tiny beanie caps for NICU patients
Premature babies lose a lot of heat through their heads, so keeping them warm is important to their healing and recovery. (Source: WMC Action News 5)
Premature babies lose a lot of heat through their heads, so keeping them warm is important to their healing and recovery. (Source: WMC Action News 5)
Clint Till's baby girl is almost five pounds now, but she is still vulnerable. Covering all of the bases to keep her healthy is imperative. A tiny knit beanie cap goes a long way. (Source: WMC Action News 5)
Clint Till's baby girl is almost five pounds now, but she is still vulnerable. Covering all of the bases to keep her healthy is imperative. A tiny knit beanie cap goes a long way. (Source: WMC Action News 5)
Amanda McCollum's son, Miles, has been in the NICU for four weeks. When he heads home, his little beanie cap will go with him. (Source: WMC Action News 5)
Amanda McCollum's son, Miles, has been in the NICU for four weeks. When he heads home, his little beanie cap will go with him. (Source: WMC Action News 5)

(WMC) - In the summer heat, you probably are not wearing too many hats. But for a group of babies in the NICU at Methodist Le Bonheur Germantown Hospital, it is a necessity.

A group of local Cigna employees decided to make hats for the babies.

Clint Till's baby girl is almost five pounds now, but she is still vulnerable. Covering all of the bases to keep her healthy is imperative. A tiny knit beanie cap goes a long way.

Premature babies lose a lot of heat through their heads, so keeping them warm is important to their healing and recovery.

"If they lose too much heat, that could increase their trouble breathing, that can make them lose weight, make them not gain weight as quickly," Nicole Mitchell, Ph.D., Neonatalogist, said. 

All 1,000 of the little hats were donated and woven by employees at Cigna, a global health insurance service company. 

"It's important to keep her wrapped up keep her head covered because she's still trying to learn how to regulate her own body temperature," Till explained.

Amanda McCollum's son, Miles, has been in the NICU for four weeks. When he heads home, his little beanie cap will go with him.

"He's getting extra attention," McCollum said. "It's something that makes him feel like a regular baby since we can't take him home yet. It's neat that they've done this special thing for him."

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