Anthem College unable to sell, closes doors - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Anthem College unable to sell, closes doors

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Students say they are not getting any answers; they also worry their financial aid money will disappear and their credits won't transfer. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5) Students say they are not getting any answers; they also worry their financial aid money will disappear and their credits won't transfer. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5)
Students at Anthem Career College are outraged after learning that the school is shutting its doors permanently. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5) Students at Anthem Career College are outraged after learning that the school is shutting its doors permanently. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5)
Anthem released the above statement in regards to its closures. (WMC Action News 5) Anthem released the above statement in regards to its closures. (WMC Action News 5)
MEMPHIS, TN -

(WMC) -  Anthem Career College in Memphis has shut its doors for good.

Thursday night, degrees and financial Aid for hundreds of students were up in the air as more than 700 students on the campus tried to figure out how to finish their college education.

Friday, the school announced they would not be able to remain open.

Anthem was attempting to sell through its Chapter 11 process, but the approval needed by the Department of Education was not received. Anthem released the following statement Friday evening:

"Despite our best efforts, Anthem Education was unable to secure timely Department of Education approval to complete the sale of 9 of its campuses to International Education Corporation (IEC). We are disappointed in this lack of regulatory approval, and as a result have been forced to make the difficult decision to close the schools today. We are continuing to put all of our efforts behind securing teach out and transfer opportunities for our affected students to ensure they may continue pursuing their educational goals, and are hopeful for a positive outcome."

Kamaria Hubert says her tuition is $19,000. With nearly a 4.0, Hubert, who was studying to be a pharmacy tech, worries she may now not graduate despite being so close.

"I got 13 more days," she said. "And there's nothing I can do because I can't take my certification."

Cheryl Parrish says she has just two classes left and would have finished by November.

"This is my first college degree," she said. "I didn't go to college after high school ... it's sad that we have to deal with this."

"They been telling us the check is coming. It's coming, it's coming. Naw, they filed bankruptcy and they got my money," said Jalesia Taylor. "They told me today we weren't receiving none of the money because by them filing bankruptcy, we wasn't gonna see a dime."

Students say they are not getting any answers; they also worry their financial aid money will disappear and their credits won't transfer.

"I have five kids. That's the reason I went on and decided to go on and go to school, so that I could be able to get a career to take care of them better," Demetria Williams explained. "Now, it seems like we're going to have to start all the way back over."

Students say they were told two months ago that the school had been sold but were reassured that nothing would change.

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