Month of Military Child recognizes sacrifices of military childr - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Month of Military Child recognizes sacrifices of military children

Captain Brian Mays, TN Army National Guard, pictured with his children Charmaine, Briason, Billy and Tedarreis and his grandson, Levi. (SOURCE: Family) Captain Brian Mays, TN Army National Guard, pictured with his children Charmaine, Briason, Billy and Tedarreis and his grandson, Levi. (SOURCE: Family)
MEMPHIS, TN (WMC) -

They are photos we are all too familiar with by now. Photos of mothers and fathers in uniform wrapping their arms around their children as they prepare to deploy with the military, as well as the tear jerking reunion photos of homecomings.

The Department of Defense recognizes the month of April as the Month of the Military Child to celebrate those children who see their parent go off, many for multiple deployments, and too many see them never return.

The awareness month was established to highlight the vital and key role children play within the military community, as well as the role they have within the family. 

"Military kids have to grow up fast because they take on duties to help maintain the household so the military parent that is away can stay focused on their job at hand in order to return safely," said Tina Mays, wife of Captain Brian Mays of the TN Army National Guard. "When families work together to support the military parent, it creates strong, healthy bonds."

According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, there are approximately 2 million military children, ranging in ages from newborn to 18 years old. Out of those 2 million military children, 1.3 million are estimated to be school-aged children.

April was established as the Month of the Military Child in 1986 by then-Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger.

Military children face a wide range of obstacles and a life unique from others their age. A life that includes permanent-change-of-station moves, deployments and training activities, constantly adjusting to new bases and towns, as well as unfamiliarity and uncertain schedules. 

On the other hand, they often gain valuable assets such as a heightened sense of patriotism, loyalty, respect, and duty. 

Copyright 2016 WMC Action News 5. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • World ends at midnight, prepare accordingly

    World ends at midnight, prepare accordingly

    Thursday, September 21 2017 3:55 PM EDT2017-09-21 19:55:13 GMT
    Friday, September 22 2017 9:44 AM EDT2017-09-22 13:44:36 GMT
    Keep shining through, just like you always do, and you know we'll meet again some sunny day. (Source: NASA)Keep shining through, just like you always do, and you know we'll meet again some sunny day. (Source: NASA)

    It's the end of the world as we know it. And we feel fine.

    More >>

    It's the end of the world as we know it. And we feel fine.

    More >>
  • Video captures woman wailing on driver in road-rage incident

    Video captures woman wailing on driver in road-rage incident

    Friday, September 22 2017 5:33 PM EDT2017-09-22 21:33:14 GMT
    Friday, September 22 2017 5:33 PM EDT2017-09-22 21:33:14 GMT

    Police say a mom and her stepdaughter first had a verbal dispute with the female driver. The suspects then approach her car and grabbed her by the hair and neck. They pulled the woman out through an open window and punched her multiple times. 

    More >>

    Police say a mom and her stepdaughter first had a verbal dispute with the female driver. The suspects then approach her car and grabbed her by the hair and neck. They pulled the woman out through an open window and punched her multiple times. 

    More >>
  • Woman nearly throws away $50,000 drone found in her backyard

    Woman nearly throws away $50,000 drone found in her backyard

    Friday, September 22 2017 12:21 PM EDT2017-09-22 16:21:28 GMT
    Image of the drone found in a Georgetown woman's yard. (Source: Mickey Cloos)Image of the drone found in a Georgetown woman's yard. (Source: Mickey Cloos)

    When a Georgetown woman discovered a drone in her backyard, she asked her landscaper to throw it away. Instead, the landscaper, Mickey Cloos, said he Googled the device, and discovered it's an advanced surveying drone worth $50,000. Now he wants to find its rightful owner.

    More >>

    When a Georgetown woman discovered a drone in her backyard, she asked her landscaper to throw it away. Instead, the landscaper, Mickey Cloos, said he Googled the device, and discovered it's an advanced surveying drone worth $50,000. Now he wants to find its rightful owner.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly