Partner of Facebook shooting victim reacts to news that Stephens - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Partner of Facebook shooting victim reacts to news that Stephens is dead: 'He took himself out like a coward'

Angela Small reacts to the news that Steve Stephens is dead (Source: WOIO) Angela Small reacts to the news that Steve Stephens is dead (Source: WOIO)
CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -

The Pennsylvania State Police confirmed late Tuesday morning that Steve Stephens, the suspect that fatally shot 74-year-old Robert Godwin, Sr. and then posted the video on Facebook, shot himself inside of his white Ford Fusion following a brief pursuit in Erie, Pennsylvania.

Immediately after the news that Stephens committed suicide, Cleveland 19 reporter Harry Boomer spoke with Godwin, Sr.'s partner, Angela Small. Her and Godwin, Sr. have two children together. 

Small was extremely emotional following the news. She said, "Why he didn't do that in the first place?"

Godwin, Sr.'s family earlier offered forgiveness to Stephens, and said they wanted to wrap their arms around him. They were able to forgive Stephens because the family said that is what Godwin, Sr. would have done.

Download the Cleveland 19 News app and First Alert Weather app.

Copyright 2017 WOIO. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly