Woman carjacked by man hiding in backseat - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Woman carjacked by man hiding in backseat

The Memphis Safe Streets Task Force released information Wednesday about an early Sunday morning carjacking.

According to officials, just before 3:00 a.m. Sunday a man snuck into a 40-year-old female's car while she was inside a BP gas station near the intersection of American Way and Getwell. 

As the woman pulled out of the station's parking lot, the man rose from the rear passenger seat.  The pair struggled, and the woman jumped from her moving car and ran back towards the store.  The suspect took control of the vehicle, and then allegedly proceeded to chase the victim.  She was able to go in between a pair of nearby buildings to escape.

The suspect left the area in an unknown direction.  He was described as a black male, 20-30 years of age, 5'9", weighing 170 pounds.  At the time of the carjacking, the suspect was wearing a white camouflage jacket and blue jeans.

Officials said the victim suffered only minor injuries.

Store surveillance cameras were able to capture photographs of the suspect.  If you have any information about this incident, officials ask you to call Crime Stoppers at 528-CASH or the Safe Streets Task Force at 680-0799.

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