Prosecutors react to deadly hit and run sentencing - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Reported by Justin Hanson

Prosecutors react to deadly hit and run sentencing

On Friday, William Yarbrough got the maximum penalty for leaving the scene of an accident involving death. A judge ordered him to spend the next two years behind bars after hitting and killing 14 year old Dillan Cole.

The memorial still stands along Simmons Road in South Tipton County.

It's where the life of fourteen year old Dillan Cole was cut short. Shortened after prosecutors said William Yarbrough hit and killed Cole on his bicycle.

"We made a charging decision and decided that really the most we could prove under applicable Tennesse law was leaving the scene of an accident involving death once Yarbrough was apprehended in North Carolina --- he did not give any indication of intoxication," District Attorney Mike Dunavant said. 
 
Cole's mother Rita Broughton told the court Friday, "I resent the fact that this man can go home and hug his kids, play with them, and he took my son Dillan's life.  I can never see his smiling face and never hold him in my arms again.  I am mad that someone can get out on the road, run over a child, and drive off and leave him.  That he has no regard for life or for the law.  What's to stop him from doing it again if he can get off so lightly."
 
However, the court did take into account Yarbrough's previous history with the law.

Dunavant continued,"That included driving on a revoked license and also prior DUI."

Yarbrough asked for a lesser sentence in court Friday but Judge Joseph Walker declined that request saying that would not be proper.

Action News Five talked with Rita Broughton's room-mate late this afternoon. She told us Rita was upset with the sentence and did not want to talk on camera.


Click here to e-mail Justin Hanson.

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