Gallaway residents prepare for major growth - WMC Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Reported by Justin Hanson

Gallaway residents prepare for major growth

In just more than a month, Gallaway officials will cut the ribbon on their very first commercial development, and they hope this move will bring about more of its kind. 

Travelers passing through the small town may think there's not much there, but leaders say that's not the case.

"We have better tax rates, we've got good fire protection, and we have good police protection," Gallaway Mayor Nick Berretta said Thursday.

According to Berretta, small town incentives like lower taxes bring about big opportunities.  By October, a plot of land along Highway 70 will be home to as many as nine new businesses.

"Banks, small retail type businesses, laundry cleaners, dentists offices, doctors office - we're open to anything commercial," Berretta said.

Longtime residents say they never thought growth would come their way.

"Back then, this whole town never did change much.  You'd have a few people come in and out but now, it's moving forwards," resident Bobby Whittemore said.

Gallaway officials believe the new businesses will bring with them new homes.  Two new subdivisions are now being planned, and in just a few months, over fifty new homes will be built in an open field along Highway 70.

"People are going to move out of the city eventually if their business is established here.  These people are going to want to be close to their businesses," Berretta said. 

"I think it's progress to me," Whittemore added. "I really think its deserving for this town.  We need it seriously," says Whittemore.

Berretta said also says the city is looking at expanding about 7 miles into a reserve area - land that could eventually be annexed as part of the city.


Click here to send an email to Justin Hanson.

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