High School

High School
WMC/SCS School on TV (Source: WMC)

ALGEBRA I

Geneva Gordon, March 27: Students will be able to write the equation of a line given two points on the line or one point and the slope of the line. Write a system of linear equations. Solve a system of linear equations by graphing. Solve a system of linear equations using elimination and substitution. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Yardstick, paper, pencil, and pen.

Geneva Gordon, April 6: Students will be able to write and solve a system of linear equations in context. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Notebook paper, graph paper, a straightedge, pencil, and / or calculator.

Dr. Emily Barbee, May 20: Students will choose which measure(s) are most appropriate for comparison based on the shape of a distribution. Watch here.

ALGEBRA II

Kevin Mattice, March 27: Students will learn that the symbol “i” means the positive square root of -1 and can use the relation i^2=√(-1) to represent solutions to equations using i when appropriate. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Whiteboard space, document camera, smart/Promethean board, dry erase markers, eraser, paper, pencil and pen.

Brandi Malone, April 27: Students will be looking at statistical studies: observational study, sample survey, and experiment. Watch here.

Dr. Emily Barbee, May 8: Students will learn to represent sample spaces for compound events as unions, intersections, or complements of other events. Watch here.

Brandi Malone, May 22: Students will understand conditional probability as the probability of one event occurring given another event has already occurred. Students will calculate conditional probabilities and use conditional probabilities to determine whether events are independent. Watch here.

Brandi Malone, May 22: Students will compare conditional probabilities from a two-way table to decide if the events are independent or not independent. Watch here.

GEOMETRY

Courtney Muldrow, March 30: Students will discover and explore the Triangle Congruence Theorems and their real- world applications. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Document camera, chart paper, markers, dry erase marker.

Courtney Muldrow, April 3: Students will use theorems in algebra to determine the relationships between specific pairs of angles. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Pencils, paper, ruler or straight edge.

Charmaniece Staples, May 18: Students will learn to determine a geometric shape or combination of geometric shapes that can describe a real-world object. Watch here.

BIOLOGY I

Agata Jedrzejewski, April 3: Students will develop their knowledge of cellular structures to help them understand how the novel corona virus interacts with human cells. Each cellular structure will be discussed in depth to ensure that students not only understand the function of each of them but also how these structures work together as a system in various different cell types to allow for proper cellular function. Watch here.

Agata Jedrzejewski, April 20: Students will be able to identify patterns of trait inheritance to predict family member genotypes. Students will be able to use mathematical thinking to predict the likelihood of various types of trait transmission. Watch here.

Agata Jedrzejewski, May 4: Students will be able to model passive transport to predict and explain how the proportion of solute in solutions affect the transfer of substances into and out of the cell. Watch here.

Agata Jedrzejewski, May 8: Students will be able to utilize models of a cell plasma membrane to compare the various types of cellular transport and make predictions about the movement of molecules into or out of a cell based on the homeostasis of energy and matter in cells. Watch here.

ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS

Tiffany Boyle, March 27: Students will examine how our values and choices shape our identity as they read “Everyday Use” and respond to text dependent questions. Students should pay attention to the conflicts and the differences in the characters’ values and priorities and how the author develops these elements while the story unfolds. Watch here.

  • Text needed: “Everyday Use” text. Text dependent upon questions.

Tiffany Boyle, April 3: Students will be able to address how the theme of a text is the result of specific choices made by the author. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Paper, pen/ pencil
  • Text needed: There Will Come Soft Rains by Ray Bradbury

Acacia Ford, April 6: Students will be able to analyze the development of a text by looking at the title, setting, conflict and how characters change to determine theme. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: Paper, pen/ pencil
  • Text needed: Thank You, M’am by Langston Hughes

Terrilyn Miller, April 27: Students will read the final paragraph of “The American Dream: A Short History of an Idea That Shaped a Nation” and determine the author’s purpose and what the text suggests about the definition of attainability of the American Dream. Watch here.

Tiffany Boyle, May 4: Students will be able to delineate the argument and specific claims in order to determine if King’s evidence is relevant and sufficient. Watch here.

Tiffany Boyle, May 8: Students will be able to determine how King uses rhetoric to develop claims and advance his point of view or purpose. Watch here.

Terrilyn Miller, May 11: Students will read the article “Grad Who Beat the Odds Asks, Why Not Others?” and determine how language and text structure impact the effectiveness of a text’s overall message. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: paper, pencil and Analyzing Language in Context and Text Structure Organizer
  • Text needed: “Grad Who Beat the Odds Asks, Why Not Others?” by Claudio Sanchez

Tiffany Boyle, May 18: Students will learn to determine how complex characters help develop the theme of a text. Watch here.

Terrilyn Miller, May 22: The learner will read the article, “Hollywood Dreams of Wealth, Youth and Beauty" and determine how language and text structure impact the effectiveness of a text’s overall message. Watch here.

Tiffany Boyle, May 26: Students will determine how complex characters and events help to develop the theme of a text through its central idea. Watch here.

ENGLISH as a SECOND LANGUAGE

David Klayton and Parker Henry, May 1: Resources for American culture and community packets. Watch here.

  • Materials needed: paper and pencil
  • Text needed: American culture worksheet pages 19-20 (hard copy), homework packet (community services)

Josephine Tope-Ojo, May 5: Students will learn the vocabulary words associated with different types of food stores and dining options and use them in speaking, writing and reading. Watch here.

Elena Lynch, May 6: Students will be able to analyze an informational text and explain the process of finding and keeping a job in the United States. Students will be able to respond to questions in writing using model answers. Watch here.

POLITICS

Greta Van Susteren, April 20: Election and voting: what exactly is politics. Watch here.

Greta Van Susteren, May 1: Students will learn about the electoral college and how a president is selected. Watch here.

Greta Van Susteren, May 8: Students will learn about the Constitution, the First Amendments, and the Bill of Rights. Watch here.

Greta Van Susteren, May 14: Students will learn about the pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children. Watch here.

Greta Van Susteren, May 20: Students will learn about the 2nd Amendment and what makes it controversial. Watch here.

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