Gov. Reeves declares Dec. 20 a day of ‘prayer, humility and fasting’

Gov. Reeves declares Dec. 20 a day of ‘prayer, humility and fasting’
Gov. Tate Reeves signs a declaration declaring Sunday a voluntary day of prayer, humility and fasting. (Source: WLBT)

JACKSON, Miss. (WLBT) - On Wednesday, Governor Tate Reeves signed a proclamation to declare Sunday, December 20, a voluntary statewide day of prayer, humility and fasting.

In a ceremony outside the Governor’s Mansion, Reeves said he was signing the declaration asking Mississippians to turn to the Lord and “ask for his protective hand over us as we conclude the year 2020 and we enter the year 2021.”

He spoke about the hardships Mississippians have faced this year, saying that people have lost their lives, their loved ones as their livelihoods as a result of COVID-19. He also spoke about individuals who have lost their homes to due natural disasters that have hit the state.

Today, I am signing a proclamation to declare Sunday, December 20th a voluntary statewide Day of Prayer, Humility, and Fasting. Please feel welcomed to join us.

Posted by Tate Reeves on Wednesday, December 16, 2020

The governor said that in times such as these, people need to come together and turn to God for help.

“Ever since the beginning of this pandemic, we’ve tried to hold opportunities for fellow Mississippians to pray – to pray together so we can be together,” he said. “We know there is power in prayer. In fact, it is what God commands us to do.”

Reeves quoted Romans 12:12, which says, “Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction and faithful in prayer.”

“As we’ve done throughout the history of this country, we will go to the Lord and ask for his protective hand over us.”

Rev. David Tipton was called to read the proclamation and to offer prayer.

“In prayer we have expressed gratitude and humility, sought guidance and forgiveness, and received inspiration and assistance both in good times and in bad,” he said, reading the document.

The document pointed to previous presidents, including Abaraham Lincon, John Adams and Franklin Roosevelt, who led the nation in prayer during difficult times.

Tipton then led the group in prayer, saying, “In our times of greatest need, the people of Mississippi look to you in prayer to direct our paths. It is appropriate and fitting in light of the current circumstances that face our world, our nation, our state, that we ask you for wisdom, guidance and comfort as many have been affected by the pandemic.”

Tipton went on to pray for blessings for the governor and his family, first responders, law enforcement officers and others who are “stretching themselves beyond the call of duty” responding to the pandemic, and asked for comfort for those who have lost loved ones as a result of the virus.

Said Tipton, “We place our future in your hands, knowing that you do all things well.”

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