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Mississippi marker honors 2 Black men killed by Klan in 1964

A woman who attended a dedication ceremony for a new Mississippi historical marker walks by the...
A woman who attended a dedication ceremony for a new Mississippi historical marker walks by the marker on Thursday, July 15, 2021, in Meadville, Miss. The sign provides information about the 1964 Ku Klux Klan kidnapping and killing of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee. Law enforcement officers found the bodies of the two Black teenagers in the Mississippi River while searching for three civil rights workers who had been kidnapped and killed by the Klan in June 1964 in a different part of Mississippi. A reputed Klansman, James Ford Seale, was convicted in 2007 in federal court in Jackson, Miss., on charges of kidnapping and conspiracy related to the fatal abduction of Dee and Moore. Seale died in prison in 2011. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)(Emily Wagster Pettus | AP)
Published: Jul. 16, 2021 at 11:03 AM CDT
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MEADVILLE, Miss. (AP) — A new Mississippi historical marker honors two young Black men who were kidnapped and killed by Ku Klux Klansmen 57 years ago.

Friends and relatives gathered for a dedication ceremony Thursday in Meadville.

Investigators found the remains of Charles Eddie Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee in a Mississippi River backwater in July 1964.

Officers were searching for three civil rights workers who disappeared from central Mississippi weeks earlier.

James Ford Seale was convicted in 2007 in the attacks on Moore and Dee. He died in prison in 2011.

Thomas Moore of Colorado Springs, Colorado, says the marker helps ensure his brother and their friend will be remembered.